Tuesday, 3 July 2012

Facing up

I was asked at short notice to do a chair at a meeting last night.  I said yes - I've learnt that it is best for me to do these things.  Tradition 7!   What?!  Ok I talked about my view of it, I did a little research before dashing over there, like the 1986 Act AA had passed so it could refuse outside donations etc.   I talked about for me this being more than money (although that is the real emphasis) but also about service etc.

Anyway - 20mins later I shut up.  There was a newcomer in the meeting - I spoke with him afterwards.  Poor man.  "How do you just stop?"   There is the dilemma of all alcoholics at this first step of the journey.  Big tough lad he was, looked like he could handle himself if you get my drift.  I asked him had he tried stopping, he had on his own via another programme all failed.  Why was he here then?   His kids, his daughters both late teens I think had said they'd disown him.  One found where the meeting was and brought him to it.  Unbelievable love.  As he told me this, the tears welled then rolled down his cheeks.   A tough, rough man beaten to and beyond surrender by drink.   I hope he goes to more meetings, I hope he can put the drink down and I hope he can build a relationship back with his kids - who clearly love him dearly.

Whatever his outcome - today I am a totally grateful recovering alcoholic.  I have all that he wants but seems so far from his reach.  We were either side of a very thin dividing line.  He's taken his first brave step - I hope his path continues.

13 comments:

  1. I cannot imagine what this is like. Nobody who hasn't been through it can. Pretty good paragraphs. They get you close to the action.

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  2. You have no idea how much I needed this reminder today. Thank you.

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  3. Thankfully I don't understand this disease. I used to hit it pretty good and will now very occasionally drink a few and that's it. It seems a shame when someone "uses all their drink tickets up" because in all reality drinking is pretty fun.

    But I can understand that some people may have a problem with it and it consumes their life. I have a couple of demons myself that I can't seem to shake. Good luck to all for taking their lives back in what is a battle they will fight everyday for the rest of their lives.

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  4. I, too, hope he keeps coming back. It can be so difficult for the newcomer to appreciate the simplicity of 'one day a time.' At least you made a connection. That's all our program asks of us.

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  5. Great for you to do those two things. We really do get by with a little help from our friends. You were a real friend last night.

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  6. Great post!

    When I first realized that I could not quit drinking on my own, it shocked many of those who know me because I never asked for help for anything. But I did for this because I was so sick and tired of the horrible loop my alcoholism stuck me in.

    I'm really grateful I had fantastic support and love, which continues to hold true for me. Drinking ceased to be fun for me ages and ages ago. I hope this newcomer sticks around too. There's lots in life to look forward to without a drink in your hand. Like learning to play guitar :)

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  7. The first step, is I imagine, the hardest.

    Best of luck to you all

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  8. Bless him. I hope it is the start of the journey for him.

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  9. You may have helped him already, just by showing him that there is life after alcohol. Best wishes as ever.

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  10. me too
    great you were there for him

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  11. you done good. fingers crossed that you'll get to see him again...

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  12. Aah, heartbreaking and hopeful all at once. Too true what a thin line divides us, but he doesn't yet know this. If only he knew how easy it was, though easy isn't the right word either. Grateful is the best description. Good on you for chairing the meeting. Your message sounds wonderful.

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